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Lesson #2, Hold that Fade, then Get Out! (Read 10478 times)
May 28th, 2008 at 11:04pm
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
Hopefully, all of you have been practicing Lesson #1 where you can consistently get into the Fade position from the flare or pancake. (On it’s back, nose towards you.) But can you hold it there, and for how long? Are you noticing that the nose of the kite is actually moving up and down ever so slightly? This is normal. Does the nose of the kite go up and then goes down into a lawn dart? This is normal too. All this is telling you, is that you are, or are not managing your slack correctly. Remember, your kite talks to you, whether visually, or physically ((through the feel of the lines pulling or not pulling.) Pretty freaky huh! Hey Honey, My kite tells me that I need to buy another Prism kite!!)  Grin Wink

We as up and coming Freestyle Pilots need to learn to “Listen“to what the kite is telling us. Let’s start with the infamous, “Once in the fade position, the kite goes into a lawn dart!” scenario. Simple answer, “Slack Management!” (Oh, Not his again, Oh yeah, this again.) So let’s try this visually and physically, flare out to a pancake, hold for a split second, pull to the fade….Where was the nose of the kite when you caught the lines on the leading edge? Don’t know? Go back to Lesson #1 using the short line exercise. OK, one more time, flare to pancake, hold for split second, pull to the fade…..AGGHH! Lawn Dart! Now I see that you took up the slack before the lines even touched the leading edge. Understandable, but wrong. Try it again, but, this time take up the slack exactly when the lines touch the leading edge. (Oh, a timing thing!) Yep, that’s why lesson #1 had the short line exercise for timing the catch of the leading edges. With short lines, you can see the lines touch the leading edges better. (You might want to re-visit Lesson #1 if you’re having trouble with this.) But it still did the lawn dart thing. Wow, that must be everyone’s favorite move! OK, let’s look at it again, but pay close attention to what the nose does when you catch the leading edges with your lines, also what do you feel when this happens. Pancake to the fade. Catch the leading edge with the lines, feel how the lines tugged your hands forward?….Ah Ha! The nose rose about 6 inches past horizontal just before your lawn dart impression. What is our kite trying to tell us? Well you’re letting too much slack out to the lines after the pull to a fade, then when you go to catch the leading edge you have to take up extra slack and by the time you do, the nose has over rotated and caught the lines for you. The tug you feel is the kite stopping in the over rotated position, then the kite actually bounces off of your lines into the lawn dart. (Wow, no wonder I lawn dart so much! I’m too bouncy!)

OK, you should have learned this in Lesson #1, but now the lines are longer timings the same, but for us “Old guys, it helps to review.” Moving on….

So, let’s catch the leading edge with our lines “Softly” and gently. Like someone throwing a kitten to you and you have to catch it “softly”, you catch but give a little. With that in mind, you can now visualize in you mind that you need to catch the leading edge before you get to horizontal and then give a little till the nose is where you want it. Once you get a feel for this, try stopping the nose of the kite when the spine is perfectly horizontal, see what it does. Then again about 1 inch past horizontal, see what it does. Keep doing this adding one inch at a time, and pay attention to what the kite does, or even better, what’s it saying to you. Good, you’re starting to listen!

Next, After that little exercise, you should know where your kite likes to be in a fade. (2 inches past horizontal, 3?) You get the idea. Now the hard part, once in a fade, the wind will make the nose go up and down, and try to come out of the fade, or if you’re lucky enough, your kite is a Fade Monster with a solid fade no matter what kind of wind you have. I’m not that lucky, so I have to pay close attention to the kite. If the nose goes up, the fade will rise, if it goes down, well you know what happens. So to keep the fade pretty solid, I try to feel the lines pulling when the nose wants to rise and actually hold the lines to add pressure so it won’t rise, and when I feel the lines start to slack when the nose wants to dive, I give just a wee bit of slack. Totally the opposite of all my natural instincts. If the wind is pretty strong, I try to walk towards the kite so it won’t oscillate so much. To add to the coolness factor, try this towards the left edge, not too far now but about half way between center and the left edge. When you get into the fade offset your hand position with your left hand closer to your body than the right hand, about 4-6 inches offset. See what that does and someone add to this thread about what the kite did and how it felt.

So now you’re do’in the fade, and your 4 year old wants you to take them to the bathroom. What do you do? Well you could tell them to go get your mom, or you can do the “Lateral Roll” to get out of the fade so you can fly to the edge and land your kite. Sounds cool, but really easy. I use a medium pull with one hand and a bit of slack with the other hand. And the kite does this roll over kind of thing with the face down nose towards you look, and all you have to do is take up all the slack and fly away to the edge and land your kite. Wow, I’m hero to my 4 year old, and I’m feel’in cool, cuz I practiced, and practiced, and then I practiced some more. Get the picture?

OK, More additional tips wanted!! Grin
 
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Reply #1 - May 29th, 2008 at 4:26am
Iddo   Ex Member

 
Hey Reggie,

Thanks, a second not to take to the beach. Looks like I'll be taking the office with me Wink

Not to worry, I'll read it at home, memorize it, and swallow the note if anyone shows up Grin.

Cheers,

Iddo
 
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Reply #2 - May 29th, 2008 at 7:52am
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
Not a problem Iddo, again, You are quite welcome.

I really don't recommend swallowing the notes. You need to chew them first!  Cheesy
 
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Reply #3 - May 29th, 2008 at 8:36am
streamhawk   Ex Member

 
Much appreciated Reggie, that's good stuff! Well written and easily understood. Only one thing, I wish I could fly with you to get one on one and instant feedback, but this is the next best thing. Thanks. Good primer or good refresher.
Bill
 
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Reply #4 - May 29th, 2008 at 9:28am
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
streamhawk wrote on May 29th, 2008 at 8:36am:
Much appreciated Reggie, that's good stuff! Well written and easily understood. Only one thing, I wish I could fly with you to get one on one and instant feedback, but this is the next best thing. Thanks. Good primer or good refresher.
Bill

Hi Bill, so if you're ever out in the Seattle area, drop me a PM. I'd be happy to fly with you. I do apologize for the lessons being kind of long, but I just have so much stuff in my head that I want people to understand. All people, not just the college physics majors, but the regular 9 to 5 kind of guys and gals. I even help kids, ask Tom. I try to help his son Eli, and now that guy is on the brink of teaching me a few things.

Anyways, You're welcome, and I hope it helps you with your own individual flying. Smiley
 
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Reply #5 - May 29th, 2008 at 9:49am
streamhawk   Ex Member

 
Very cool Reggie, if I ever am out your way, you can bet on it. No apology necessary on the length of the lessons, sometimes all those words make a better mental image. No stopping now that you've started, I'm enjoying it alot.
Bill
 
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Reply #6 - May 29th, 2008 at 4:18pm
knightflyte   Ex Member

 
Another good lesson, Reggie. Thanks for the time and effort.

I THINK someone mentioned making a training video, but I am not sure. It's the style of commentary you make I find valuable. Things that don't transfer well through just watching a video you manage to emphasize and bing home so the fledgling can mentally complete the picture and understand WHAT a kite is doing.

"OK, one more time, flare to pancake, hold for split second, pull to the fade…..AGGHH! Lawn Dart! Now I see that you took up the slack before the lines even touched the leading edge. Understandable, but wrong. Try it again, but, this time take up the slack exactly when the lines touch the leading edge. (Oh, a timing thing!)"

Brilliant! and emphasizes exactly what one needs to look to time this manuever. This kind of commentary on a video would be priceless.

Are you a teacher in real life?

Thanks again. Nice job.
 
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Reply #7 - May 29th, 2008 at 6:41pm
Edward_fesdigital   Ex Member

 
UBNVUS wrote on May 28th, 2008 at 11:04pm:
Like someone throwing a kitten to you and you have to catch it “softly”, you catch but give a little.


Ok, I got my neighbor's kitten and had a friend throw it to me over longer and longer distances...I see what you mean about catching it just right and the "bounciness"....I found that like Luke in Star Wars I could close my eyes and catch the kitten just concentrating on the mewing sound (of course having to correct for the doppler effect).  After a few hours of kitten tossing I decided to try out my new found techniques....wow...can you say "forever" fades!  Thanks!


Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin

P.S. no animals were actually harmed in this exercise....
 
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Reply #8 - May 29th, 2008 at 9:25pm
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
Quote:
Ok, I got my neighbor's kitten and had a friend throw it to me over longer and longer distances...I see what you mean about catching it just right and the "bounciness....


Ed, OMG!!!! When I read this I just had to put the laptop down cuz I was laughing so hard, I was afraid the tears from my eyes would flood the keyboard. Grin I couldn't sit up straight and my wife just kept telling me to be quiet. Man, my side hurts now, and I used my T-Shirt sleeve to wipe the tears away. I now have to change shirts since this one is all wet from my tears.

Ed, why are you reading my lessons anyways? You're way past this and you should be writing lessons too. Glad you liked it, and "Thank You" for the laugh!!

( Man you're kill'in me! )
 
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Reply #9 - May 29th, 2008 at 9:48pm
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
knightflyte wrote on May 29th, 2008 at 4:18pm:
Another good lesson, Reggie. Thanks for the time and effort.

Are you a teacher in real life?


Knightflyte, Not a problem, but the wife thinks I need to get a life. I've been working on the lessons and giving comments and feedback so she thinks that's all I do. Oh well, as long as I have an internet connection, I'm cool!

I'm a part time ski instructor if that qualifies as a teacher, but no, not a teacher like you're thinking.

BTW Don't read Ed,s comment, it'll kill ya!
 
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Reply #10 - May 30th, 2008 at 3:29am
benjai   Ex Member

 
Reggie,

Thanks for taking the time to write lesson 2, I'm sure everyone on here appreciates your effort (due to time pressure and crappy wind, I'm falling behind the course though - do I have to go in some kind of "special" class to catch up Grin) You probably don't remember, but holding the fade was the subject of my first ever post a few weeks ago - thanks!

One thing I find really useful in the way you write, is the explanation of what happened and why, when it doesn't work. Knowing that the lawn dart out of fade occurs because of too little slack, or taking the slack up too early really helps. I figured it out by trial and error, and short lines really helped with this. For holding the fade, I found the hardest thing was to re-program my head that giving slack makes the nose rise (eventually) and taking up slack pulls the nose down. It's really easy to see the nose drop and default to "pull to increase altitude" mode... Always resulting in a lawn dart.

I guess one other thing I found (apologies if this is obvious) is that stuff like this can be practised higher in the window - giving you more time to sort the kite out after you come out of the fade before you hit the ground. As confidence and proficiency increase so can the altitude be decreased… Maybe this is the second law of freestyle kiting “trick altitude is inversely proportional to skill”. I’ll leave you to come up with the first law (maybe “the size of the quiver is proportional to the ambition of the pilot” or “reduction in bank balance is proportional to the altitude of the kite below zero”).

Keep writing the lessons, and I’ll keep trying to fly them – deal?

Ben
 
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Reply #11 - May 30th, 2008 at 9:18am
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
Benjai wrote on May 30th, 2008 at 3:29am:
You probably don't remember, but holding the fade was the subject of my first ever post a few weeks ago - thanks!

Ben, I do remember only cuz I went back to look at it! Wink So I thought you were going to give a report of your findings from different parts of the wind window.

Anyways, glad that I can help, although I need help too!

Hey WD, Can you help me? What am I doing wrong?
 
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Reply #12 - May 30th, 2008 at 9:26am
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
Great comments, but has anyone gone out and done this? And If so, what were your results? As the writer of these lessons, I need the feed back to make future lessons better.

Thanks in advance!
 
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Reply #13 - May 30th, 2008 at 10:45am
PadawanFlyer   Ex Member

 
UBNVUS wrote on May 30th, 2008 at 9:26am:
Great comments, but has anyone gone out and done this? And If so, what were your results? As the writer of these lessons, I need the feed back to make future lessons better.


I was out last night in the sweetest of winds and practiced holding fades and trying to make them rise and fall.

A thought occured to me as I was doing this.  Catching the kite in a fade seems like catching an egg in an egg toss.  You catch it gently, and get hold of it before you apply tension to really hold it.  Otherwise, it just breaks!  Smiley

Thanks for great tutorial!
 
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Reply #14 - May 30th, 2008 at 8:16pm
WinterDaze   Ex Member

 
UBNVUS wrote on May 30th, 2008 at 9:18am:
Hey WD, Can you help me? What am I doing wrong?


Nothing! Mate you're in the groove....

Go Reggie, Go Reggie...


 
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Reply #15 - May 30th, 2008 at 8:44pm
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
WinterDaze wrote on May 30th, 2008 at 8:16pm:
Go Reggie, Go Reggie...


WD, I've been told to go to H*ll before, Is that how they say it down under? Wink
 
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Reply #16 - May 30th, 2008 at 8:46pm
WinterDaze   Ex Member

 
Well maybe one little thing Wink

Quote:
So to keep the fade pretty solid, I try to feel the lines pulling when the nose wants to rise and actually hold the lines to add pressure so it won’t rise, and when I feel the lines start to slack when the nose wants to dive, I give just a wee bit of slack.


I like the word pressure here. As the nose oscillates up apply pressure, oscillates down, reduce pressure...

With the 'fade', the word pressure is more appropriate than the  connotation of the word slack, having 'slack' (excess droop in your lines) isn't ideal, but proactive controlling of your pressure/tension on the lines is closer to the zen of this move...

But I had to get pretty bloody picky to find that...

The 'what just happened then' aspect of this is the thing I haven't seen explored enough elsewhere. Providing the what 'wrong' looks like is very helpful, many other lessons are based on  just doing it the right way... describing the other outcomes that can occure will short track the learning for many I think.

Good work Reggie!

WD

Don't Stop Till We Get Enough!

 
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Reply #17 - May 30th, 2008 at 8:56pm
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
Quote:
With the 'fade', the word pressure is more appropriate than the  connotation of the word slack, having 'slack' (excess droop in your lines) isn't ideal, but proactive controlling of your pressure/tension on the lines is closer to the zen of this move... [quote]

I really like that!!
[quote]But I had to get pretty bloody picky to find that... [quote]
That's OK, They pick on me all the time. Please make teh voices stop!

[quote]
Don't Stop Till We Get Enough!



Now we're Michael Jackson? And I thought I had a problem!! Grin
 
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Reply #18 - May 31st, 2008 at 2:27pm
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
WinterDaze wrote on May 30th, 2008 at 8:46pm:
I like the word pressure here. As the nose oscillates up apply pressure, oscillates down, reduce pressure...


I knew you would find something! I do admit I looked at that very sentence a few times, but in my haste to post the lesson I did a lousy job of editing.

Thanks WD for your insights. This is the stuff I'm talk'in bout! More comments like these will make the lessons better and easier for our readers to learn and be successful. Great job WD!!
 
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Reply #19 - Jun 2nd, 2008 at 11:03am
streamhawk   Ex Member

 
Reggie, I've been working on better fades before you posted this lesson, but just wanted to let you know with some better (fresher) thinking on holding one, from a pop up launch Saturday with my Zeph, I got a beautiful picture perfect rising fade, and that was having to run backwards as the wind dropped just as I went into the fade...even with the running backwards bit I was getting a better fade than previously. Many thanks on your lessons!
Bill
 
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Reply #20 - Jun 2nd, 2008 at 5:08pm
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
So Bill, What did you take from the lesson to the flying field that made you successful? I'm curious.
 
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Reply #21 - Jun 3rd, 2008 at 7:02am
streamhawk   Ex Member

 
had to think about it Reg, but I believe I had not been timing the catch just right, I had the "soft catch" part down, but had not been catching the nose in the right place consistently. Whatever it was I had been doing, it got better. Maybe part of it was, with this refresher...fresh in my mind, I paid much closer attention to what I was doing, and with your explanation, why I was doing it.

Bill
 
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Reply #22 - Jun 5th, 2008 at 3:39pm
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
Hey  Bill, Sorry to make you strain the brain, but inquiring minds want to know! Grin

Thanks again for sharing. Just think, your comments might help someone achieve this faster. I know it took me a long time to get the timing for this move.
 
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Reply #23 - Jun 6th, 2008 at 7:38am
streamhawk   Ex Member

 
thanks Reggie, I'll be working on this for quite some time until I can call it my own. Sometimes when I wake up in the morning, just trying to remember my name can strain my brain.

Bill
 
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Reply #24 - Jun 7th, 2008 at 6:10pm
BrightLights   Ex Member

 
Gotta say, am enjoying the educational combo Reggie and WD  Wink Grin Smiley
 
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Reply #25 - Jun 7th, 2008 at 6:12pm
BrightLights   Ex Member

 
Oh and now I'm not sure whether  I posted my flare to fade story in the right place - but it's under lesson one so I think that's ok.  Smiley
xxBree
 
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Reply #26 - Jun 8th, 2008 at 3:30pm
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
Quote:
Gotta say, am enjoying the educational combo Reggie and WD  Wink Grin Smiley


Can I add that WD has been a good inspiration for these lessons. I still need a good kick in the pants once in a while, and someone had to do it.

Thanks WD!!
 
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Reply #27 - Jul 4th, 2008 at 5:46pm
benjai   Ex Member

 
I have been out trying to follow this lesson. Because I can recover from the ground into a fade and latereral roll out pretty much every time, i figured I could "fade". How wrong was I ...

At Reggie's suggestion, I tried to hold the fade for an extended period. Boy it's tricky, and I stupidly set myself the challenge of holding a ten second fade. Not only that, but I put the challenge on the forum.

So tonight, I went and tried. I was determined not only to do it, but film it too. As you can see from the film, I nearly ran out of light!!!!

Enjoy my little "fade challenge film" HERE. It might help someone too, as I managed to catch my input for the pop-up to fade launch in the corner of the screen....

Ben
 
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Reply #28 - Jul 8th, 2008 at 6:16pm
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
Great Video Ben, I like it!! I guess I need to go out and practice this too. Now can you make an animation of the nose osscilating and when the tension should increase or decrease? Nose up for the rising fade, rocking the nose up then down for a flic-flac, Wow, It's only the beginning....
 
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Reply #29 - Jul 9th, 2008 at 7:55am
benjai   Ex Member

 
UBNVUS wrote on Jul 8th, 2008 at 6:16pm:
Great Video Ben, I like it!! I guess I need to go out and practice this too. Now can you make an animation of the nose osscilating and when the tension should increase or decrease? Nose up for the rising fade, rocking the nose up then down for a flic-flac, Wow, It's only the beginning....



OK, by popular (well Reggie at least and I assume he's popular Grin) demand, here's a little animation showing the application of tension and slack while holding the fade. Notice the cyclic nature, and that slack makes the nose rise (which is difficult for a noob like me to get my head around at first). I'm made an improvement in this animation with the inclusion of a "tension meter". This shows you when the tension is applied. Note that the tension is let off before the nose rocks down to horizontal. You have to spot that the nose is dropping and release tension immediately. With slack, the nose will eventually rise again.... Also see that to "catch" the fade, the tension is re-applied just before the leading edge makes contact with the lines... Also note that the movements are highly exaggerated here for clarity - I practice, you can make the kite hold the fade with almost no oscillation in really smooth wind (but there's always a little).

Hope you like it and it helps soemone...

Ben

...

[for some reason I have to post a picture in this post to get the animation to display, so here's a random one]

...
 
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Reply #30 - Jul 9th, 2008 at 12:39pm
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
Ben, way cool! I'm gonna have to have you show me how you do this!!! This is going to make the lessons even better.

Thanks!!
 
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Reply #31 - Jul 19th, 2008 at 9:44pm
Nak   Ex Member

 
Thanks Reggie!

Great lessons. My personal results from #1 & #2 or as I like to call it Find the Fade.

I started with the pop-up launch to fade, hold the fade as long as possible. Tension management.
This is my current favorite way to launch. I'll never stop practicing this.
Wind preference: 3 - 7 mph.
With a little work the fade can be held as long as the wind holds, but the wind I play in often fall below 2 mph. I can now move the fade all over the window, steering by modifying the nose to the wind direction, remember left is right. Make it rise with gentle tugs on the lines, Timing and Tension.

Next addition is the flare/pancake. Hey, I see this position all the time. The easiest entrance is from a downward dive, wind dependent for where in the window. Usually a gentle push is all it takes, if more is required I found it gives better results when both arms come from one side with hands together. This doesn't always need to happen flat to the horizon, start pulling the fade. The fade really flattens an off horizontal flare but adds momentum for throwing the kite around. Still looking for that back-spin. The roll-out part is ingrained after several hundred launch to fade and can be had inside, outside, up, or down. I like down and out.

Next we go looking for the fade elsewhere. Where did we see that flare position before? After practicing a few axels I'll never completely follow directions, I started seeing the flare position. Pull a fade at the nose away. Sweet! Next candidate the back-flip -> lazy Susan. Now it gets interesting. While spinning a few LS I stopped one with nose towards added a small tug (both lines) to pitch the kite over and hey there is the flare, pull that fade.

I know there is more I'm still trying to put the pieces together. Biggest help has been teaching myself to get and keep the kite up in low wind. My bridle is now always set on barely stay in the air. The Hypnotist can pull like a mule when the breeze freshens, and having the bridle set for the higher winds seems to help it stall in lower wind.

Still playin' never stop learnin'

- Jim
 
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Reply #32 - Jul 21st, 2008 at 9:35pm
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
Jim, Sounds like you're well on your way. the !/2 lazy with the nose pointed towards you then pull both lines to a pancake then back to the fade is the start of a Flic-Flac. Just repeat it a couple of times and you'll be Flic-Flac-ing all over the place.

Great job of noticing the pancake position during the axel, I find that if I do a soft axel, it slows down so the pancake position is almost perfect for the pull to fade.

Now I know you'll love lesson #3!!  Grin Grin Grin Grin
 
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Reply #33 - Jul 23rd, 2008 at 3:59pm
BODEGAVEGA   Ex Member

 
IT WORKS! And just like you said. Great lesson Reggie. You make it very easy to visualize what to do. Between lesson 1 & 2 and my short time at our kite hill gathering, I have learned to launch from the "belly down/nose away" position on the ground into the fade and catch the kite ever so gently, and then let it rise just a little and do the lateral roll out and land it. I know its baby steps but I'm kind of excited about it because it gives me hope for bigger and better tricks. I don't know exactly how may tries it took but in about an hour I was able to do it 4 times. I was frustrated because I had very little wind, but in the end I think that actually helped me get a better feel for the process. And starting with the short lines helped a great deal as well. I just hooked up the 20' lines from my 3D to the Zephyr. I can't wait to try this exercise again in a steady breeze because I'm sure I could pull it off pretty easily now. I think one of the most important parts of this lesson is that little bit at the end, practice, practice, practice.
Thanks again.
     Bo
 
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Reply #34 - Jul 24th, 2008 at 8:31am
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
Hey Beau, Glad all your hard work has paid off. When ever you get a chance you should PM me when you can make it to the Hill. I'll be happy to work with you on lesson 3 and 4 since we didn't have a lot of time at the Kite Fly. Glad you could make it!!

Yes, the Pactice, practice, practice part is very important, but I should have added "Patience" at the end..

See ya around!!
 
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Reply #35 - Jul 24th, 2008 at 9:23am
benjai   Ex Member

 
It's been three weeks or so since I completed the 10 second fade challenge, and I've probably spent 10 hours flying since then. I've been practicing all sorts of stuff, but I really enjoy returning to the fade...

I found a video a little while back that definitively showed the inputs required to correct the roll of the kite. Up until then, it was a case of trying to pop it into a dead level fade, control the pitch and altitude and cross my fingers. About a week ago, I put what I had seen into practice, and for the first time corrected roll!!! Definitively, you add tension to the line connected to the wing that is lower. This turns the kite and presents more of that wing to the wind and hence it gets more lift and rises. It's pretty logical really, as it's just like a backspin, where the pulled wing rises over the other during the rotation. Generally, the kits is most stable when the spine is pointing staraight into the wind, so if your fade is in the left half of the window, the nose nees to point slightly to the left.

The trick I finally got was that the timing of the inputs is a bit like the pitch correction. It's essential to increase the tension in the lower wing as soon as it starts to drop, not once it has already dropped. In fact, it's often required to add tension to the other wing as soon as the dropping wing starts to rise again, otherwise a lateral roll results.

Anyhow, applying this, and getting a little lucky with the winds, meant that 30 second fades were possible the other night. Next stop - the backspin!!!!

Hope this helps someone...
 
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Reply #36 - Jul 24th, 2008 at 10:34am
asburyparkjohn1   Ex Member

 
At this point I am just starting to FADE from a flare but am able to FADE almost always from a ground launch (nose away, belly down and right line over left - this cross-over HELPS - a tip from Shawn). One thing I noticed and this makes sense from this pictorial from Reggie is once you get into a fade what is the worst thing that can happen. Obviously - only ONE thing - a QUICK nose plant particularly in moderate to high winds. One technique I am using and it seems to be working which I picked up from a recent TRICK PARTY in Connecticut - is once you get the FADE - try some baby steps FORWARD until it stablizes. Remember as the kite pitches down slack will make it RISE. I have started to do this and find almost all my FADES rising to a comfortable height after being airborne. I then hold and then lateral roll after 60 second holds. Just a thought. I got a good tip from a Masters flyer at Liberty SP recently in terms of hand & arm sweep movements to get the FADE from the flare - so that is this weekend at Asbury Park, NJ. Flic-Flacs are next on my trick list. Its strange - I have recently done multi-lazies and Lewis's but still can't flic flac - I have been ignoring the FADE much too long. Time to break through Dean ...
 
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Reply #37 - Jul 24th, 2008 at 8:39pm
UBNVUS   Ex Member

 
Ben, Now if you read this lesson again, look at the end where I say to offset the hands, one closer to you than the other. Part of that exercise was for some one (you) to comment about the very thing you wrote about, not only that, you can steer your kite left and right with these little moves. Great stuff Ben, and good observations.

Dean, the flick flacs will be easy if you let the nose rise a bit in the fade just before you pull to flare the kite to a pancake. Just remember to stop the kite just when the kite spine gets horizontal for just a split second, and then pull to the fade. Once you get this down, you can catch the fade a bit over rotated and the nose will naturally bounce into the flair so you don't have to initiate it and it will start to look rally smooth and effortless. Have fun!!!
 
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