Kite Repair

If you should damage your kite while hard at play, don’t despair! There’s almost nothing that can’t be fixed on a sport kite, and usually you can do it yourself In a few minutes or less.

If you break a spar, you can order a replacement and replace it yourself. Most sail tears can be patched strong as new with our near-invisible Gear-Aid repair tape. This material has an ultra-strong adhesive that resists the effects of the sun for the life of your sail.

We also make a handy Kite Repair Kit that includes patch tape, a variety of extra connector fittings and endcaps, line sleeving tools, utility knife and a detailed instruction booklet with lots of tips and tricks for easy field repairs.

Helpful downloads:

Gregg and Amanda setting up a Bora above Scolia Pass, Alaska

Gregg and Amanda setting up a Bora above Scolia Pass, Alaska

Sail Repair

Most tears and punctures can be invisibly repaired using a special high-strength transparent adhesive film called Gear Aid, which sticks to the back of the sail and is unaffected by moisture or UV from the sun.

If your repair requires sewing, remove the frame from the kite and send us just the sail so we can get you a quote and take care of it for you. There are very few mishaps that can’t be effectively fixed by our talented in-house repair team. To send in a repair, download our repair form and include it with your sail so we know who you are and how we can help.

If your sail is truly mangled beyond repair (bad dog!), give us a call and we’ll try to help. Often we can find a previously flown or slightly blemished sail to get you back in the air.

How to Use Gear Aid repair tape

1. Use a little rubbing alcohol to clean the back side of the sail in the repair area. Avoid acetone and other solvents as they can damage the fabric coating.

2. If available, use some masking tape on the
FRONT of the sail to align the torn edges and close up the tear.

3. Cut a Gear Aid patch that extends at least 3/4” around the perimeter of the tear. Round the corners a bit to keep them from peeling up.

4. Apply the patch smoothly to the BACK side of the sail, then remove the masking tape from the front.

That’s it! Your patch will be noticeable as a shinier spot from the back side of the sail, but from the front it should be close to invisible.

If your tear is up against a reinforcement such as the nose or the trailing edge of the kite, your kite may require some sewing work to make the strongest repair.

Flying lines

The high-performance Spectra and Dyneema flying lines in our multi-line kites are expensive so it’s good to know a few tricks to keep them in good shape.

To prevent tangles, always leave your lines fully stretched out when your kite is on the ground.

If it’s windy, use a stake through the handles or flight straps to keep the kite from blowing away when you’re not flying. A screwdriver works fine or you can purchase a Ground Stake.

NEVER walk around with your handles and drag the lines across the ground. If you need to walk to your kite, set the handles on the ground before you walk and you’ll never need to untangle
a lineset.

For detailed info on flying line repairs, equalizing and sleeving see our Handy Kite Repair booklet.

Gregg and Amanda setting up a Bora above Scolia Pass, Alaska

Gregg and Amanda setting up a Bora above Scolia Pass, Alaska

Useful knots
Dyneema and Spectra lines for multi-line kites are very slippery, making them hard to knot securely. The knots below are all you need for most kite situations.

Frame repair

Most broken rods result from a hard nose dive or pulling on the kite while a wingtip is stuck in the ground. Tumbling kites in the surf and slamming them in car doors are other favorite ways to break rods.

Most frame parts appear on both sides of the kite, so you have a handy reference to follow as you disassemble and reassemble the kite. Just look closely at how the bridle and fittings are attached and oriented, then copy that as you install the new part.

For detailed info on a variety of frame repairs, see our Handy Kite Repair booklet.

To order spare parts visit our Spare Parts page.

Looking for parts for an older kite? We keep as many in stock as we can for models we’ve produced all the way back to 1992. Visit our Discontinued Kites page to look up your kite.

Sending us a kite to repair

1) Print out a copy of our Repair Form and fill it in completely. Include it with the kite when you send it in so we know who you are and how we can help.

2) If at all possible, remove the frame from your kite and send us just the sail. This speeds up the repair process and saves on shipping costs.

3) We’ll assess the problem and get you back in the air as quick as we can. In the rare instance that your sail is beyond repair, we can often find you a good deal on a replacement from our demo inventory.

Ship your kite to us at our Seattle headquarters:

Prism Designs, Inc.
Attn: Repairs
4214 24th Ave West
Seattle, WA 98199

Sail Repair

Most tears and punctures can be invisibly repaired using a special high-strength transparent adhesive film called Gear Aid, which sticks to the back of the sail and is unaffected by moisture or UV from the sun.

If your repair requires sewing, remove the frame from the kite and send us just the sail so we can get you a quote and take care of it for you. There are very few mishaps that can’t be effectively fixed by our talented in-house repair team. To send in a repair, download our repair form and include it with your sail so we know who you are and how we can help.

If your sail is truly mangled beyond repair (bad dog!), give us a call and we’ll try to help. Often we can find a previously flown or slightly blemished sail to get you back in the air.

How to Use Gear Aid repair tape

1. Use a little rubbing alcohol to clean the back side of the sail in the repair area. Avoid acetone and other solvents as they can damage the fabric coating.

2. If available, use some masking tape on the
FRONT of the sail to align the torn edges and close up the tear.

3. Cut a Gear Aid patch that extends at least 3/4” around the perimeter of the tear. Round the corners a bit to keep them from peeling up.

4. Apply the patch smoothly to the BACK side of the sail, then remove the masking tape from the front.

That’s it! Your patch will be noticeable as a shinier spot from the back side of the sail, but from the front it should be close to invisible.

If your tear is up against a reinforcement such as the nose or the trailing edge of the kite, your kite may require some sewing work to make the strongest repair.

Flying lines

The high-performance Spectra and Dyneema flying lines in our multi-line kites are expensive so it’s good to know a few tricks to keep them in good shape.

To prevent tangles, always leave your lines fully stretched out when your kite is on the ground.

If it’s windy, use a stake through the handles or flight straps to keep the kite from blowing away when you’re not flying. A screwdriver works fine or you can purchase a Ground Stake.

NEVER walk around with your handles and drag the lines across the ground. If you need to walk to your kite, set the handles on the ground before you walk and you’ll never need to untangle
a lineset.

For detailed info on flying line repairs, equalizing and sleeving see our Handy Kite Repair booklet.

Useful knots
Dyneema and Spectra lines for multi-line kites are very slippery, making them hard to knot securely. The knots below are all you need for most kite situations.

Frame repair

Most broken rods result from a hard nose dive or pulling on the kite while a wingtip is stuck in the ground. Tumbling kites in the surf and slamming them in car doors are other favorite ways to break rods.

Most frame parts appear on both sides of the kite, so you have a handy reference to follow as you disassemble and reassemble the kite. Just look closely at how the bridle and fittings are attached and oriented, then copy that as you install the new part.

For detailed info on a variety of frame repairs, see our Handy Kite Repair booklet.

To order spare parts visit our Spare Parts page.

Looking for parts for an older kite? We keep as many in stock as we can for models we’ve produced all the way back to 1992. Visit our Discontinued Kites page to look up your kite.

Sending us a kite to repair

1) Print out a copy of our Repair Form and fill it in completely. Include it with the kite when you send it in so we know who you are and how we can help.

2) If at all possible, remove the frame from your kite and send us just the sail. This speeds up the repair process and saves on shipping costs.

3) We’ll assess the problem and get you back in the air as quick as we can. In the rare instance that your sail is beyond repair, we can often find you a good deal on a replacement from our demo inventory.

Ship your kite to us at our Seattle headquarters:

Prism Designs, Inc.
Attn: Repairs
4214 24th Ave West
Seattle, WA 98199